How To Cook Steak

We know that when you come to see us you have no intention of cooking and we are more than happy to create a wonderful meal for you and your family.  However, if you are cooking for your family or having friends over for a dinner party then you will want to do your best to create a great tasting meal.  We will go over a couple of factors to help you better cook steak and create a sauce to go with it as every meat you cook should come with a sauce.

Which Cut Of Steak To Use

When I first started learning how to cook one of the first things I took away was that the quality of ingredients plays a huge role in how the meal comes out.  When it comes to steak it is impossible to turn a cheap and tough piece of beef into a juicy, soft, and mouthwatering steak.  If you are stuck with this task then you are taking on not only a difficult task but possibly an impossible one.  My cut of choice is the New York strip.  Even though this cut is on the more expensive side it is an amazing choice and if you cook it right will come out with a nice texture on the outside and a juicy and soft meat on the inside.

How To Cook

The most important part of cooking a steak is using high heat.  This is the biggest mistake that home cooks make when it comes to cooking steak is that they don’t get the pan hot enough.  When you cook a steak at a low temperature what happens is some of the liquid starts to cook out of the beef it doesn’t evaporate out of the pan right away and you end up boiling the meat and you end up with a sort of grey colored meat which is extremely chewy and generally a horrible experience all the way around.  So before you put the steak down in the pan make sure the pan is very hot.  After your pan is done heating up you can check it by dropping a little bit of water in the pan.  If the water beads up upon contact with the hot pan then your pan is hot enough and ready for the steak.  Use an oil with a very high smoke point and once the oil has heated up place the salt and peppered steak down into the pan and don’t touch it.  It will initially stick to the pan but after 30 seconds or so a beautiful brown crust will form on the bottom and pull the steak away from the pan.  Flip and cook to the desired level.  At the end of the cooking, with roughly 30 seconds left, I like to throw in a chunk of butter and some rosemary into the pan to finish with the steak to give a nice decadent taste to the outside of the steak.